Wichita State Shockers forward Cleanthony Early (11) dunks the ball against the Alabama Crimson Tide at Coleman Coliseum. Mandatory Credit: Marvin Gentry-USA TODAY Sports.

NCAA tournament money helping smaller schools compete


According to Todd Hefferman of The Southern Illinoisan, the Wichita State Shockers’ 2013 Final Four appearance will earn the Missouri Valley Conference seven million dollars over the next six years. The money will be divided among the ten schools representing the conference.

Hefferman states the payment system is determined through a “rolling average of total units over a six-year period.”  The units are the number of NCAA tournament games played by all teams in a respective conference.

I always get a little ticked when people say college athletes should be payed money for what they do.  Besides the ultimate privilege of playing a college sport while receiving an education, I believe the money is appropriately spent elsewhere. For example, Hefferman says Southern Illinois will receive about $350,000 because of Wichita State’s fantastic season.  That is a ton of money for a mid-major school that probably needs countless improvements to its athletic facilities. With better facilities, all the athletes at a school benefit rather than a selected few.

A potentially harmful consequence of paying college-athletes is fans will lose interest.  I believe many people are drawn to college sports because the athletes play for their school, not a paycheck.  A payment system would render this principle obsolete, and leave the audience watching mediocre professional athletes instead of fantastic college amateurs.  What do you think?

Tags: NCAA Basketball Southern Illinois Salukis Wichita State Shockers