Fred Greenslade-USA TODAY Sports

Tyler Seguin has been a boon for the Dallas Stars, Boston Bruins will regret dealing him


Sometimes a player has so much talent that it’s easy to forget how young they are. Case in point: Tyler Seguin when he played for the Boston Bruins. They drafted him with the second-overall selection in 2010, watched him grow into the team’s top goal scorer two years later and handed him a massive $34.5 million deal.

Then, it seems, that the team left him alone with his new-found recognizably and millions of dollars as a 20 year-old. Why there’s a great mystery surrounding where Seguin’s game went is beyond comprehension.

When the Pittsburgh Penguins drafted Sidney Crosby, they knew that he was a long-term, major investment and they protected him like one. They didn’t stick him in a hotel in Pittsburgh and expect the small-town Canadian kid to just figure it out. No, they gave him a mentor in Mario Lemieux and had him sleeping in his basement for two years before feeling comfortable enough in Crosby as a man to let him go out on his own.

They taught him how to be a professional instead of just expecting him to be one right out of the box as a teenager making the jump into the NHL.

While some players are perfectly capable of doing that, the teams that fare the best with their prospects are the teams that know how to teach a player how to be a man and a professional. The Bruins never made those strides with Seguin. Instead, he got a few slaps on the wrist and some stern talking-tos.

There’s a feeling that Boston never treated Seguin like a man and never seemed interested in helping him become one. If the comments that the brain trust made during the “Behind the B” television special are indication, the Bruins straight up didn’t like Seguin as a person or a player.

No wonder his game went down the drain and he acted out. He’d been treated like a child as punishment for acting like a child and being young. Instead of Cam Neely setting up a strong example for Seguin to follow, they seemed to just spill oil on him. In short, the best thing that could have happened for Seguin as a man and as a player was to get traded out of a poisonous Bruins system where he wasn’t going to be given the opportunity to grow. Where the B’s never taught him to play the kind of hockey they wanted and replaced him on the second line with an aging, ineffective forward in Jaromir Jagr.

Yelling isn’t teaching. Being abrasive isn’t teaching.

Seguin shouldn’t have had his hand held, and that’s not what would have best for him. There’s a way to aid a young man grow into an adult, and posting a guard at his door and leaking stories to the media to make yourself look better in the press isn’t the way to do it.

There will be a point that Seguin will be a top-10 scorer in this league. Boston will maintain the posture that the deal wasn’t about goals and points. That the kid was just too soft and was too unwilling to get his face smashed in to be a Bruin. But in two years they won’t be a better team without him.

Tags: Dallas Stars NHL Tyler Seguin

  • James Reardon

    How can you already tell they are going to regret trading him? The season just started in the last few weeks and this could just be a hot start. Plus, Loui Eriksson and Reilly Smith are playing well to start the season. Also the Bruins have two more players that they got in the deal that could play with the team later this season or for years to come.

    • Navy Nuke

      Because in just 8 games for Dallas, Seguin has 4 goals and 6 assists. That is more than Reilly Smith and Loui Eriksson combined at this point (albeit one less game for the Bruins).

      Trading Seguin was a dumb decision. Dallas made out like a bandit.

      I would also say that with what they are doing with Marchand is the same thing they did with Seguin, and it’s a failed concept. Bruins management needs to wake up.

      • Mike Jones

        Well, something tells me that, being a nuke, you know nothing about sports.
        Seguin relished the spotlight in Boston in the worst way. Instead of working his tail off to be the best that he could, he got caught up in partying in one of the biggest college towns in the country (if not the biggest, in terms of percentage of the population in a major city).
        This trade was probably good for him; it kept the pressure off of him, while also making him “the guy”. Being the first-line center for Dallas under Lindy Ruff is a whole lot easier than being a 2nd line winger in Boston under Claude Julien.

        • Navy Nuke

          lol.. I know nothing about sports? right… Nice failure of an assumption.

  • Jtrand

    It seems like this is a heavily biased article. While I’m not saying you’re wrong, I feel it is just way to soon to be saying what you’re saying – “Boston will regret trading him” is just your opinion and it is way too early to tell. If you can recall, Seguin has a history of being streaky. Also, Dallas’ style of play is different than Boston’s style of play as Eriksson even stated. The Bruins have a defense first mentality, and while that may not be best for spectacular individual performances (Seguin’s point total), it is best for the team. Seguin playing along with Jamie Benn and Eric Cole will yield better results for Seguin. But look at how Dallas is doing as a whole, and look at Seguin’s +/- rating (which is a 0 right now).

  • Steve

    The Bruins tried to give Seguin a surrogate family to live with and he turned them down. He wanted to live on his own. They did that with Patrice Bergeron as well as others in the organization as well. I’m a huge Bruins fan and while I agree that the Bruins will indeed regret trading Seguin, I think this is unfair to bash the Bruins culture. It is true Seguin didn’t fit the Bruins mold just like Phil Kessel didn’t fit. They are a defensive minded, team-first organization and focus less on individuals. As a team, the Bruins are a winning organization but they have no real “exceptional” talent on the team. I’ll take team-first approach over individual stats – just ask Steve Stamkos or Ovechkin…

  • Mike Jones

    “…No, they gave him a mentor in Mario Lemieux and had him sleeping in his basement for two years before feeling comfortable enough in Crosby as a man to let him go out on his own.”

    “They taught him how to be a professional instead of just expecting him to be one right out of the box as a teenager making the jump into the NHL.”

    “While some players are perfectly capable of doing that, the teams that fare the best with their prospects are the teams that know how to teach a player how to be a man and a professional. The Bruins never made those strides with Seguin. Instead, he got a few slaps on the wrist and some stern talking-tos.”

    “Seguin shouldn’t have had his hand held, and that’s not what would have best for him.”

    How do you have these statements in the same article? Absolutely horrendous. You couldn’t have possibly been more obvious in your bias about either your love for Seguin, or your disdain for the Bruins organization. Basically, you suggested that putting Crosby in Mario’s basement was treating him like a man, and that giving Seguin the opportunity to live on his own and make decisions, and making him face consequences, is treating him like a child. In your opinion, no matter what they did, they mishandled Seguin.

    Seguin may very well become a superstar, and I wouldn’t be surprised in the least. The point remains that he wasn’t going to succeed in Boston. Not because of Boston’s management, but because of Seguin’s reluctancy to buy in to what the Bruins were doing, and to not be a party animal. I’m certain that the veterans on the Bruins were constantly on him to not be a party animal. This kid, at 21, went so far with his partying that he showed up in one suit one day during the playoffs, and showed up in the same suit (without being showered) to the rink the next day. It wasn’t that long ago that I was 19 and partying all night before I had to go to my landscaping job the next day, usually showing up in a polo shirt and khakis. Everyone on the team knew what he was doing.

    Seguin only has himself to blame for his immaturity. Maybe he’ll thrive in a town that isn’t hockey crazy, and has an influx of college girls ready to jump his s*** on every street corner.

  • RealityBites

    I think we’ll always have some people who feel that the Seguin trade was a bad move as there are still people who feel that the Kessel move was a bad idea. And everytime the Bruins have dry spell these names will crop up again and again. I was never a Seguin fan (and I really wanted to be) and oh by the way, he was also our number two stats guy when he was here too. SO? Real hockey fans know that there are so much more about this sports that can’t be calculated into stats. I like what I see in Eriksson and Smith so far. They are so fun to watch. I would even venture to say I even think Smith is better than Seguin. I will NEVER regret the trade, even if the Stars make it to the play-offs.