2017 NBA Mock Draft: The 76ers lock up a point guard

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Tyler Lydon

Jan 24, 2017; Syracuse, NY, USA; Syracuse Orange forward Tyler Lydon (20) shoots the ball over Wake Forest Demon Deacons guard Keyshawn Woods (1) during the second half at the Carrier Dome. The Orange won 81-76. Mandatory Credit: Rich Barnes-USA TODAY Sports

Syracuse’s Tyler Lydon made 39.8 percent of his 3-point attempts over two college seasons. He has projectable NBA range and a quick release that makes him a dangerous offensive role-player at 6-foot-9. Lydon didn’t get a ton of volume in college, largely playing in the spot up shooting role, but he did shoot better than 80 percent from the free throw line, which should make a team more confident in his fundamental shooting stroke. Lydon’s 3-point shot opens up the game for his teammates on offense and can allow him to attack close outs in a straight line as well.

On defense, Lydon’s primary value in college came as a weak side rim protector. He averaged 2.0 blocks per 40 minutes over his two seasons with the Orange. The key for the Syracuse product will be figuring out what positions he can defend in the NBA after spending nearly every college possession in a 2-3 zone. Ideally, Lydon would be able to guard both forward spots, but it’s not clear he has the lateral mobility to do so.

Learn more about Tyler Lydon at The Step Back.

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Tyler Lydon

SF/PF,Syracuse

The Brooklyn Nets get to use their own first round pick here after swapping picks with the Boston Celtics. One option available to them is snagging a sharpshooting combo forward who can help space the floor and defend the rim on offense.

Syracuse’s Tyler Lydon made 39.8 percent of his 3-point attempts over two college seasons. He has projectable NBA range and a quick release that makes him a dangerous offensive role-player at 6-foot-9. Lydon didn’t get a ton of volume in college, largely playing in the spot up shooting role, but he did shoot better than 80 percent from the free throw line, which should make a team more confident in his fundamental shooting stroke. Lydon’s 3-point shot opens up the game for his teammates on offense and can allow him to attack close outs in a straight line as well.

On defense, Lydon’s primary value in college came as a weak side rim protector. He averaged 2.0 blocks per 40 minutes over his two seasons with the Orange. The key for the Syracuse product will be figuring out what positions he can defend in the NBA after spending nearly every college possession in a 2-3 zone. Ideally, Lydon would be able to guard both forward spots, but it’s not clear he has the lateral mobility to do so.

Learn more about Tyler Lydon at The Step Back.

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