Why do Texas and Oklahoma play at the Cotton Bowl?

The Texas Longhorns play the Oklahoma Sooners every year at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas.

In one of the last great remaining neutral-site games in college football, the Texas Longhorns meet the Oklahoma Sooners in the Cotton Bowl every October.

While the Longhorns and the Sooners have two incredible football cathedrals back in Austin and Norman respectively, tradition brings them to Dallas for the State Fair of Texas. With the exception of three seasons (1913, 1922-23), this rivalry game has been played in Dallas annually. Even with the Cotton Bowl being out-of-date compared to AT&T Stadium in Arlington, it is still played there.

Here is the logical behind why the Red River Showdown is played every year at the Cotton Bowl.

Red River Showdown: Why Oklahoma plays Texas every year in the Cotton Bowl

The reasoning behind why this game is played at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas is simple really. Dallas, Texas is approximately halfway between Austin, Texas and Norman, Oklahoma. By playing the rivalry game here, it allows both traditional powers to be showcased in the Dallas-Fort Worth Area. Plus, with the game happening during the State Fair of Texas, what it not to love about it?

In most instances, this is why many neutral-site games are played where they are. The same principle applies to why Florida plays Georgia in Jacksonville annually, as that is part of the country where it is 50-50 Bulldogs and Gators fans. The biggest difference between these rivalries are  Red River kicks off at 11:00 a.m. CT and the State Fair of Texas being in the Cotton Bowl’s shadow.

As long as the Cotton Bowl is maintained, tradition will prevail and the game will be played there.

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